What the —?

wolf-y-w

It was reported last week that Martin Scorsese’s “The Wolf of Wall Street” broke the record for most swear words ever used in a movie. Well, that surely is something to be proud of in the most dreadful sense of the word. Screenwriters, and writers of all types for this matter, should understand that using curse words in almost every sentence is totally unnecessary and does not enhance the script, book, poem, etc, in any way. I get that some writers feel as if they are depicting real life through the way their characters speak, express themselves, move, and have their being, but using over 500 swear words in anything is just outrageous! Besides, arts and entertainment aren’t just reflectors of reality; They also influence culture, thereby helping to make their consumers’ realities what they are. It’s a two-way cycle.

Another thing this bit of non-newsy news set the gears in my mind to thinking about is exactly what makes “bad” words bad, causing the MPAA to rate a feature R for abundant use of bad language in an effort to keep peoples (I know, this isn’t an official word) of an age under 18 away. You, think about it for a sec. It really is a mind-boggling thought. The letters of the alphabet aren’t considered bad and neither can they be. So, what makes a combination of innocent letters form a “bad” word? Our intentions? Most likely. Actually, this thought pattern applies to most everything in the world. See, perhaps nothing is bad on earth, except our hearts which have the tendency to pervert every good thing. But, I digress. This blog isn’t for philosophizing – something which should be saved for professors and college papers. 😉

Do you have some commentary? Leave your reply below!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s